GIS - Geographic Information Systems


 

Mapping  Services

   

 

The Clermont County Auditor’s Office GIS Department was established in 1996 to allow them to better perform their tasks and to provide the taxpayers with useful information.  Our GIS Viewer contains nearly all of our GIS data layers much like our Property Search page.  The GIS Viewer is interactive and enables quick and easy searches for addresses, owners, parcel numbers, school districts, townships/villages, and even Virginia Military Surveys.  You can view property lines, addresses, subdivisions, roads, flood plains, survey monuments and topography (contour lines).   Use the tool bar at the top and the buttons at the bottom to search, turn layers on/off, draw, measure and print your own custom maps.  Simply click on a parcel to view all of the data on the Auditor’s website.

Click the links above to view our online mapping applications.  Be sure to check out all the maps available on our Interactive Maps page. Please contact our office if you have any questions or comments about our maps or services.

 

 

 

What is GIS?

A Geographic Information System (GIS) is used to capture, store, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographical data.  It is made up of a few key elements, including hardware, software, data, and the people to maintain it.  The Clermont County Auditor’s Office operates our own GIS that allows us to preform many tasks and to provide the taxpayers with useful information.  Mapping in an essential function of a GIS.  We use our GIS to map the nearly 100,000 parcels of land to support the appraisal of real property in Clermont County. One key piece of data in in our GIS is our aerial imagery, also known as basemaps.  Photographs are taken from a specially equipped airplane and then pieced together to make a complete image of the County.  Another key piece of data is our parcel lines.  We use surveys and other land records to create a layer of information to represent property lines.  These lines are representations of the property lines but are not meant to be used in place of the legal documents or fieldwork performed by certified professionals.  We are dedicated to making our data as accurate as possible, but you should always contact a licensed surveyor if you have a property line dispute.

Attribute data from the Auditor’s appraisal system is joined with the spatial GIS data layers.  Parcels lines in a map are an example of spatial GIS data, and attached information such as owner name, address, and parcel number would be considered attribute data.  GIS is a very effective and efficient problem solving tool which assists the Auditor’s office significantly. The data in our maps is updated on a nightly basis, so you have access to the most current information available.